Category Archives: New Music

Announcements and discussion of new Wheatmyer Music works

Ponder Anew

Ponder: to think about (something) carefully, especially before making a decision or reaching a conclusion.

AnewIn a new or different and typically more positive way.

Ponder Anew is the title of my latest hymn arrangement for orchestra. The title comes from the 3rd line of what is usually presented in hymnals as the 3rd or 4th stanza of the hymn, Praise to the LORD the Almighty. This line states: “ponder anew what the Almighty can do.” Using the definitions above (taken from the online English Oxford Dictionary), this line could be rephrased, “think carefully,  in a new and more positive way, about what the Almighty can do .”

To think about things in a new and more positive way is much of the point of writing new hymn arrangements. A fresh or different musical setting of a familiar text emphasizes different words and phrases or casts the words in new light. The differences may be subtle or startling but, either way, when well done a text that had become stale or threadbare can shine with a new brilliance that renews the power of the words. Admittedly, Ponder Anew is purely an instrumental work but the text and tune is so familiar that the words will spontaneously spring into the listener’s mind as the theme unwinds. Thereby, the new harmonies, rhythms, and phrasings in Ponder Anew will likely elicit from the listener a new and different way of thinking about the text. If the music achieves my intent, the listener will consider afresh the attributes and works of Almighty God when hearing this completely new setting of the tune.

A bit of background on the arrangement:

Joachim Leander’s “Praise to the LORD, the Almighty,” as translated by Catherine Winkworth, has consistently been one of the most published hymns in the English language since the mid-20th Century. Its anonymously composed tune, LOBE DEN HERREN, almost exclusively paired with this text since the 17th Century, is also much loved. Even J.S. Bach found it suitable to feature in his 137th cantata.

This arrangement for orchestra features three variations of the complete hymn tune utilizing metrical and harmonic changes to maintain focus on the tune and its text. These are bracketed via repetitions of the first five tune pitches in harmonic planing over a crescendoed pedal tone producing steadily increasing tension with unexpected resolutions of the beginning and concluding phrases.

The music in not particularly difficult and should be readily playable by high school or higher level musicians. Yet, both musicians and audience will find the work interesting and enjoyable with music that reflects the majesty and mystery of the its subject.

Listen here:

Leave a request in the comments for information on obtaining the sheet music.

SDG

Robert

The First Noel

Ah, Christmas Eve. There’s a chill in the air, the service is planned, the sanctuary is decorated, bulletins are printed, announcements have been heralded, but . . . what’s that? you’re missing a piano solo? Well, what could be better than a new take on the angelic announcement from the first Christmas, The First Noel?

​Take a listen to this compelling piano solo and see if you don’t agree it would be a wonderful addition to your Christmas Eve service or other Christmas season programming.

Available for perusal, listening, and purchase at: https://www.swirlymusic.org/music/solo-piano/robert-myers-the-first-noel-for-solo-piano/

Brass Quintet for Advent

Here’s a unique setting of HYFRYDOL for brass quintet called Long Expected Jesus that is just perfect for the Advent season. This creative arrangement is readily playable so you still have time to work it into your Advent schedule. It will work perfectly as a prelude, postlude, offertory, or devotional item. Listen, preview and purchase at https://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/long-expected-jesus-digital-sheet-music/20423571. Purchase includes full score and parts for trumpet 1 and 2, horn in F, trombone, and tuba.

A Lovely Setting for a Lovely Rose

(Original posting 11/21/2017) Are you still looking for a special choral piece for this Christmas? Consider, Lo, a Rose, a fresh, intimate, and contemplative setting of the traditional German carol, ​es ist ein ros entsprungen​. Combining the English translations of Theodore Baker and Harriet Krauth, ​it mixes light piano accompaniment with a cappella sections for SATB chorus to create a hauntingly beautiful rendition of this classic Christmas carol. The intimate nature of Lo, a Rose​ works for small ensembles or quartets as well as larger choirs. It provides strong artistic rewards without requiring extreme investment of time and effort. So, yes, you still have time to work this up for your Christmas program! Lo, a Rose​ is well suited for the concert hall or the sanctuary and would make an exquisite piece for observance of Christmas Eve. View the score, listen to a demo, and purchase parts at: ​https://www.swirlymusic.org/music/choral-music/robert-myers-lo-a-rose-for-satb-choir-with-piano/

Fingal’s Fantasy

(Original posting 11/10/2017) Here’s the first live performance of my solo piano work, Fingal’s Fantasy​, as performed today by the inestimable Keji Lu, a native of Beijing, China. Thank you, Keji, for making this come to life!

soundcloud.com/wheatmyermusic/fingals-fantasy-live

​The title and the core musical material comes from Felix Mendelssohn’s Hebrides Overture, which is better know as Fingal’s Cave. I was first exposed to this music in the very politically incorrect Warner Brothers  1940’s cartoon series based on Inki and the myna bird. The theme was played at every appearance of the myna bird. If you listen closely to ​Fingal’s Fantasy  you might recognize a few snippets of the theme music and visualize a little bird hopping through the jungle.

Major Milestone!

(Original posting 7/11/2017) Although much work remains, the first draft of my Easter cantata,  Wounded, Bleeding, Still Proceeding, is now complete! This is a significant milestone towards completing this cantata, submitting my master’s thesis, and graduation. It’s been a seven-month journey so far and I’m only a couple of weeks behind my planned schedule. So praise God for His faithfulness!

The piece just completed is a resurrection setting called, “Why?”. The title derives from the angel’s question to the women who were first to view the empty tomb in Luke 24:5, “Why do you seek the living among the dead?”. The question is set as soprano solo over a high B pedal tone with eerie accompaniment from pitched percussion and woodwinds in a nebulous key center with some biting dissonance. Full chorus and orchestra then joins in a major key to proclaim, “He is not here, He is risen!”. I think the piece works, but it’s hard to be objective. Nevertheless, I pray that this piece does justice to this foundational story of Christianity.

So, the first 90% of the work is done and all that’s left is the second 90% of the work (That’s an old project management joke, folks), like proofreading, editing, second-guessing, lots of listening and tweaking, etc. etc. etc.) The plan is to have all this finished by the end of August for submission to my advisor. Then SWBTS will let me take comprehensive exams in October and I’ll finally have this degree completed!

And you know, keep in mind that I’d like to program a performance of this work in 2018. So . . . if anyone is intrigued by the thought of presenting this cantata then let that seed sprout, keep watching here for news updates, and get in touch.

It’s almost summer, and you know what that means, right?

(Original posting 5/25/2017)  Well, here comes Memorial Day weekend, the unofficial beginning of summer, and a long, long, summer it will be here in Texas. It’s time for bare feet, cook outs, baseball, tank tops, road trips, and all that goes with hot weather! Of course, Memorial Day is far more important than that and this website is a great spot to catch up on the somber significance of the day. But the beginning of summer also means it’s time to select your music for the coming Advent and Christmas season. You have started thinking about your Christmas music, haven’t you? May I offer a few suggestions? Here are four new and distinct options for four different forces that would fit well in your service and concert programming.

Lo, a Rose – for SATB chorus and piano. A somber and contemplative setting of the traditional carol, Lo, How a Rose E’er Blooming. You’ll find this a lovely treatment of the tune and text that won’t tax your rehearsal time. This arrangement is moderately easy but allows good musicianship to shine. The light and delicate accompaniment, with hauntingly beautiful harmonies, directs the focus onto the text while providing just the right amount of color and interest. Thus, “Lo, a Rose,” allows a choir to demonstrate artistic merit without enduring exhaustive preparations. The setting portrays that the light and salvation brought to us by the Rose was achieved via a bitter and sorrowful path.
Listen and purchase on Swirly music here.

The FIrst Noel – for solo piano. This setting of the beloved Christmas carol applies fresh and distinctive harmonies to the traditional melody. A haunting, and slightly dissonant, introduction sets a contemplative mood that heralds a unique approach to the carol. The A sections contain lush harmonies and delicate lyrical phrases which contrast with the syncopated and ornamented melody of the up tempo B section. The work is within the grasp of the intermediate to advanced pianist without extensive rehearsal but still contains sufficient challenge to provide a rewarding experience for performer and listener alike. THE FIRST NOEL is an excellent piece for offertory, instrumental praise, candlelight service, or any occasion reflecting on the miracle of Christ’s incarnation during the Christmas season.
Listen and purchase on Swirly music here.

Long Expected Jesus – for brass quintet. This fresh setting of the Welsh tune, HYFYRDOL, works perfectly for an offertory, prelude, or devotional function. Although written for the Advent season, the multiple familiar hymns set with this tune make the piece suitable throughout the church year. It is readily performed by high school or higher musicians yet still contains sufficient variety and artistic expression to be rewarding for even advanced performers. The familiar melody is stated clearly throughout and accompanied with interesting and sonorous harmonies so as to be accessible to all audiences.
Listen and purchase on Sheet Music Plus here.

Divinum Mysterium – for full orchestra. DIVINUM MYSTERIUM is the tune name we know by the hymn, “Of the Father’s Love Begotten.” In this arrangement for full orchestra, the tune is woven together with CANTIQUE DE NOEL, or, “O, Holy Night,” in a compelling tapestry that captures the transcendence and the imminence of Christ’s birth. It would make a compelling addition to an orchestral Christmas program. Suitable for high school, college, or advanced church orchestras.
Listen on Sound Cloud here. Send me a note under CONTACT or in the comments below if you’re interesting in purchasing the score and parts or if you have questions.

Wounded, Bleeding, Still Proceeding Update

(Original posting 5/21/2017) Well, with the finale (He Became Like Me) completed it’s time to move back to the two remaining unwritten movements in my Easter cantata. These will be the settings of the crucifixion and the resurrection of Christ. Of course, these are the two most daunting movements. It’s not the music that is intimidating, as I already know what I want to do, but the gravity of the subject matter as the two most important events in Christianity weighs heavily as a duty to set them well. First up will be the crucifixion setting, which will also include the Garden of Gethsemane and the trial, and will be called, Wounded, Bleeding, Still Proceeding. It will feature tenor solo with SATB chorus. The harmonies selected for this piece are inspired by Sergei Rachmaninoff’s setting of Simeon’s Song, the “Nïne otpushchayeshi” from his All Night Vigil. Although somewhat camouflaged, the strings introduce Wounded, Bleeding, Still Proceeding with “Nïne otpushchayeshi’s” opening swaying chords and the rocking motion carries on as underlying accompaniment to the melody. We shall see how it turns out!

He Became Like Me

(Original posting 5/17/2017) In my last post I had just begun work on the final movement of my Easter cantata, which is a traditional choir anthem about substitutionary atonement and Christ’s call to discipleship titled, He Became Like Me. Well, while still preserving the right to make further editorial changes, I’m glad to announce that this piece is now complete! It is set for SATB chorus with piano and optional orchestral accompaniment. Although He Became Like Me is part of a full Passion setting, I plan to offer it as a standalone choral anthem as well in the near future. Click the link below for a MIDI sample of the orchestral accompaniment. Enjoy!
https://soundcloud.com/wheatmyermusic/he-became-like-me-orchestra

Easter Cantata still progressing . . . (more Wounded, Bleeding, Still Proceeding)

(Original posting 4/17/2017) Well, March was the target date for completing my thesis project (an Easter cantata) to qualify for Spring graduation, but it’s not going to happen, . . . sigh. I knew it was an ambitious goal from the get go, so the disappointment is not too great. In fact, it appeared all along that this project would require at least part of the summer to complete and that’s just what it’s going to take. I want to spend the time needed to get this right since I’m looking at this more as a debut product rather than just another hurdle in a degree plan. It would be much more gratifying to see it performed than to have it spend its days on a dusty library shelf. (for more background on what this project is about see my 3/13/2017 post on Wounded, Bleeding, Still Proceeding)

At present, I’m working on the final movement , a traditional choir anthem about substitutionary atonement and Christ’s call to discipleship titled, He Became Like Me. (And no, just because it’s the final movement doesn’t mean the cantata is nearly done! Writer’s block was building up, and I jumped to the end to find some fresh creative energy.) As any good presentation of God’s word should do, the piece is a musical call for response to the Easter message and will close with the fourth stanza of Isaac Watts’ classic hymn, When I survey the wondrous cross.

He Became Like Me is actually a text and melody I wrote well before going back to school. My inability to successfully sculpt it into a pleasing form was at least a part of the impetus pushing me back to school to learn how to make it work. As I near completion of my degree it is delightful to find that this song wasn’t just a bumbling beginner’s muddle but actually contains some good musical ideas and a compelling text. Speaking of text, here are the lyrics:

He became like me so I could be like Him;
Laying down His riches, becoming just a man;
Familiar with my sorrow, acquainted with my grief;
Setting my example with His hands, His feet;
Exchanging all His glory for a twisted crown of thorns;

Surrendering His power, clinging to the tree;
Refusing ev’ry aid, He paid it all for me;
Craving ev’ry curse, the Father’s wrath to know;
Embracing ev’ry nail, so the blood of grace would flow;
and seeking out the tomb, to bury ev’ry sin.

And then, He rose again.
And now He calls me friend.
He’s my redeemer, defender, my counselor, and my God!
Love so amazing, love so divine!
And all that He asks from me, is to take my cross daily,
And to follow Him faithfully, and offer Him
All I have, all I am, All I will ever be,
       just as He did for me.

He became like me, so I could be like Him.

©2017 – Robert Myers / Wheatmyer Music – All Rights Reserved